knitwit confessions ~ original patterns

as i twirl my stitch

into the next stitch

which i twisted yesterday

i get to stand

in then

now

and tomorrow

when i will return to stitch

into this moment

twisting lambs wool

against winter’s frosty glare

 Picture 118

It’s crazy fun to take a length of cord, twist it around a stick or two, flick your wrists for a while and walk away with a washcloth, a toy, a fishnet, a shawl or whatever you desire.  At least, I think it is.  The fiber arts promise an endless plethora of possibilities.  Knitting is my favorite.  I love working monochromatic, natural miracles.  Texture is my “thing”.  Oh, and I endeavor to remain technologically challenged.  I have a NEED to make things that NEED hand washing.  It’s a curious phenomenon that deserves further exploring.  However, that would divert us from the subject at hand, knitting.  Therefore, I will come back to hand-washing, another time.

As a small child I watched my mother and her friend, Doreen, knit; in amazement.  When my mother knitted, I would wiggle up under her left arm.  She would wiggle her arm out and back between my body and her body; telling me, “Lin, I can’t work like that.”

“But, I can’t see good from here, Ma,”  I’d protest.

“You don’t need to see, I do, hush, I’m counting” she would tell me and try to tilt her body and her work, so I could get a better look; while she continued.

Doreen was pregnant with her first child when I was five.  I tried to wiggle up under her arm to watch her knit, also.  That didn’t help, though; her belly was too big.  So, she would hoist me up on her lap; take my little hands, in her hands, and we would knit together.  We made a blanket for her baby, together.  I felt so big and good and important; because I did something important.  I helped make a blanket for a baby who wasn’t even born, yet!  And, when that baby was born, it would be warm; because I helped.

Every time I knit, my Mom and Doreen continue to knit with me.  I carry both of them, along with myself on to the next generation of crafty fingered beauties.  Over the years I’ve taught many people to knit.  I love proving someone wrong when they tell me, “I could never do that.”  The look on their face as they do it, is an indescribable gift.  And hearing them say, “Oh yes I can do that,” is even better.

Barbies, babydolls and trolls were my first fashion victims.  There was a time when everything had to be argyle.  Yarns from all over the world have slipped past my needles.  As a teenager I inevitably wandered into crocheting (yet another story!)  There has been as much as 350 pounds of yarn in my home.  I NEED to take something to knit, wherever I go.  Certainly, I display compulsive behavior.  My name is Franc and I’m knit-addicted

Several years ago I noticed a woman, knitting.  She was knitting differently, and really fast!  I introduced myself and asked if she minded me watching.  Constance taught me Continental Knitting.  Sure, I knew there were other ways to knit; so what.  It’s all the same.  I tried this different way and couldn’t get “with it”.  Somehow, I’d find my self knitting English, again.  It was annoying.  However, I am stubborn.  About two years ago I decided I was going to knit something, anything, Continental.  Every time I found myself knitting English, I made myself rip it all out and start over.  It didn’t take long for me to master Continental under those conditions!

Now, I’m a born again knitter (don’t roll your eyes, yes I know, that’s the worst kind of anything; the born again. . . . yet another lengthy subject.).  My speed has at least doubled.  Not only is Continental faster it’s easier on stiff old fingers, too.  How did I waste nearly 50 years knitting English?

Green knitting is very satisfying.  Lately, I’ve been working on replacing most household paper products with hand knits.  Wash cloths, dish towels, hand towels and sponges can all quickly and easily be worked in natural fibers.  Cotton is a favored yarn; as it’s soft, absorbent and holds soap suds, nicely.  Jute, hemp and sisal are all good additions; for scrub-ability.  And here texture rules!  I love basket weave patterns.

basketcase

medium basketweave washcloth pattern:

washcloth2

with 4 ply cotton and size 10 1/2 needles finished size aprox 8″ X 8″

cast on 38 sts

row  1) p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k4, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k4, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1, k2, p1

row  2) k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p4, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p4, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1, p2, k1

row  3) repeat row 1

row  4) repeat row 2

row  5) p4, k2, p4, k4, p4, k2, p4, k4, p4, k2, p4

row  6) k4, p2, k4, p4, k4, p2, k4, p4, k4, p2, k4

row  7) repeat row 5

row  8) repeat row 6

row  9) repeat row 1

row 10) repeat row 2

row 11) repeat row 1

row 12) repeat row 2

row 13) p1, k2, p4, k2, p6, k2, p4, k2, p6, k2, p4, k2, p1

row 14) k1, p2, k4, p2, k6, p2, k4, p2, k6, p2, k4, p2, k1

rows 15 – 28) repeat rows 1 -14

rows  29 – 40 ) repeat rows 1 – 12

bind off

wshclth2ptn

small basketweave washcloth pattern:

washcloth1

S M A L L W A S H C L O T H
3 1 S T I T C H E S X 3 9 R O W S
B I N D O F F 9
X X X X X X 8
X X X X X X 7
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 3
X X X X X X 2
X X X X X X 1
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 0
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 9
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 8
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 7
X X X X X X 6
X X X X X X 5
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 3
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1
X X X X X X 0
X X X X X X 9
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 8
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 7
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5
X X X X X X 4
X X X X X X 3
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 2
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 1
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 0
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 9
X X X X X X 8
X X X X X X 7
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 6
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 5
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 4
X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 3
X X X X X X 2
X X X X X X 1
1 30 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 20 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

The Xs are stitches that come to the front, in odd rows they are purl, in even rows they are knit.  The pattern is read right to left.

knit with 4 ply cotton on size 10 1/2 needles; finished size, aprox. 7” X 7”

cast on 31 stitches

row 1)  p1, *k5, p1, repeat from * across

row 2)  k1, *p5, k1 repeat from * across

row 3)  p1, k5,* p7, k5 repeat from * to last st, p1

row 4)  k1, p5, *k7, p5 repeat from * to last st, k1

row 5)  repeat row 3

row 6)  repeat row 4

row 7)   repeat row 1

row 8)   repeat row 2

row 9)   p7, *k5, p7, repeat from * across

row 10) k7, *p5, k7, repeat from * across

row 11) repeat row 9

row 12) repeat row 10

row 13) repeat row 1

row 14) repeat row 2

row 15) repeat row 3

row 16) repeat row 4

row 17) repeat row 3

row 18) repeat row 4

row 19) repeat row 1

row 20) repeat row 2

row 21) repeat row 9

row 22) repeat row 10

row 23) repeat row 9

row 24) repeat row 10

row 25) repeat row 1

row 26) repeat row 2

row 27) repeat row 3

row 28) repeat row 4

row 29) repeat row 3

row 30) repeat row 4

row 31) repeat row 1

row 32) repeat row 2

row 33) repeat row 9

row 34) repeat row 10

row 35) repeat row 9

row 36) repeat row 10

row 37) repeat row 1

row 38) repeat row 2

row 39) bind off

wshclth1ptn


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